The 2 Products of a Blogger (and other artisans)

Hey, craftsperson! Hi!

You blog, right? (or you take pictures, you paint, you write poems, you invent things or concepts). Here’s a little patterntool from Paul Valéry for your pleasure :

  1. Your article (and your past ones) can be considered as a state, a work which can be taken over, modified.
  2. The product is your article, it stays, it’s independent : it makes sense for readers.
  3. But the work of modeling, building and rebuilding has its own value.
  4. The work you had to do reacted in you, changed you, and in a way invented another product, which is a more skillful and clever you.
  5. You learn from what you write.
  6. Feedback feeds the magician.
  7. Your article is never really finished. You could make it better all the time, couldn’t you?
  8. It could teach you something more, after all…
  9. In a way, you learned so much working on it, that you could erase it completely and do it again. Better.
  10. A craftsperson will be satisfied with his/her product when he/she learned enough from it.

 

Thanks for reading!

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I’m much more interested in the work than in the product of the work

P. Valéry

 

 

 

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“Painting is easy, but…”

Degas was like :

“Painting is not this difficult when you don’t know how… but when you know how… oh! Then it’s something else!”

Paul Valéry

from Instagram: http://ift.tt/2sj0OHU

One-Lined Ideas for Writers, Part II

The suites of transformations you need to express things, respecting the conditions your have to respect.

You write, you read what you just wrote, in a loop. A closed balanced between you and you. A pleasure can resonate.

Pull weapons out of other people’s work – to use you own resources.

Find the person you write for – even if this person does not really exist. Golem it.

Use what is made for use. Find a drawer : open it. Break what is fragile. Push what tilts.

Try what has never be done, but appears as possible.

Your work can always been gone back over. This is your job. Find your “until”.

Try a thousand ways to write an idea until you meet a favorable words figure.

Find a force. Find where to use it. Apply a force.

At one moment you are attracted by what is needed, by what goes forward to the goal.

You dream to write, you desire to write, you call. But it’s not to be confused with the state where you MAKE.

Our most precious states are unstable – the artist answers trying to stabilize them.

What you feel. What you do. What you want to make feel.

 

All these microseeds come from Paul Valéry‘s Poietis (Poïétique). They aren’t quotes, I kneaded them for your pleasure. Have fun.

One-Lined Ideas for Writers, Part I

Thanks for reading!

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Denis Sarazhin, Ukrainian Painter

http://sarazhin-denis.com/catalog/paintings
https://www.instagram.com/denis_sarazhin

Denis Sarazhin (he’s born in 1982) has a style. He seems to be obsessed by hands, and long twisted bodies. He has something of Vroubel, of Segantini.

Have a great day!

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cSARA 138 Polina

cSARA 100 Early Spring

cSARA 83 Portrait in Scarf

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Richard Estes, American Painter

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Estes

Hyper-Realism painters are exhausting. Exhausting.

In front of this work, which is technically impressive and visually killing you, you wonder : How does he do that???

More realist than reality, right? There’s a “too much” thing here, and it’s also really gorgeous. In an awe : and it’s a good sign.

I chose 10 paintings for you :

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bilde

 

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Tricks & Ropes : Two Apprentices

ONE

A Method is ideal, it’s a model, it’s abstract, transmissible and transferable, you can teach it. It’s logical, manageable, and you start from yourself to apply it.

TWO

There’s this new apprentice. He’s young, fast, has instinct, he’s casual, but clever. He’s doing pretty well!

But :

THREE

Of course, as soon as you work with life & its pertained complexities, things begin to hurt, to squeak, to skid and to run out of control eventually. One gets stuck. Two… crashes. Both are surprised!

FOUR

If you’re the person in charge, you have to deal with these apprentices. One has to learn suppleness and how to find colors. Two has to learn methods, to canalize.

FIVE

In French we say “Avoir du métier“, “To have some skills from working experience”.

  • Methods are effective quickly if you work on algorithms, on computer programming.
  • Instinct is great if you draw, take pictures or write poems. You go girl!

But :

There’s always this “stuck moment” where they understand (I hope so) that they have to learn the other skillside, THEN to learn how to build their own engine with both.

Both have to learn the ropes, the magical ones and the logical ones. One has to learn how to be like water, how to adapt quickly. Two has to learn rules (even to bend’em), to find where the levers are…

 

A diplomat, a teacher, a therapist,

 

This Patterntool can be used to study : Diplomacy, Teaching, Photography, Marriage, Poetry, Writing, Architecture, therapy : in every job involving humans or creativity, your skill is made of strict methods AND the fast ability to watch and adapt to the situation.

 

One question : in your field, on what platform of the scale are you?

 

Thanks for reading!

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The painter paints then steps back to judge then steps forward to paint then…

The painter paints then steps back to judge then steps forward to paint then…

All this in a loop.

As a perfect metaphor for creativity, which could be defined as :

a dance between effusion and lucidity

Every thinker-creator is aware of this dance of focus/de-focus, and this is a splendid territory to explore in its lightest nuances, its thinnest articulations.

I give you three examples I found from a book from Michel Thévoz :

  1. Artaud talked about an intellectual eye in the delirium : intelligence and folly never don’t merge, they revolve around each other.
  2. Dubuffet, a painter, advised practicing “alternated construction works”. One day on a painting, the day after on another one. A way to disembark as a visitor each morning.
  3. Michaud is famous because he tried drugs to create, but he was very clear on this : everything he wrote was after the dissipation of drugs effects, he wrote in the lucid phases of oscillation, and talks about “miserable miracles”.

 

There’s a need of a “New Eyes” state. Monet wished at times to be born blind and suddenly discover vision, to have a wished freshness…

Baudelaire and Valéry both talk about the urging need of having a critic inside a good poet.

Maybe one secret tool of every creator is disenchantment, is to surf on this descending wave which follow the “miserable miracles” of the fast defocused “inspiration”.

 

Tools :

We could go further, right? How, in your field (blogging, photography, poetry, teaching, management, advertising, writing?), do you articulate this necessary dance? Do you need external things to lose focus? Are you aware of useless rushes when you’re fast, effective and proud… to get nothing good at the end? Where and who is your inner critic? Is this person inside you too powerful, too weak? How is it activated? What would you add? You know what inspiration is, but how do you “fix” it? Do you need to? How do you canalize?

 

Thanks for reading!

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