How to find ideas to blog about?

I often meet/read this question in blogs : “How do I find ideas?”

Most of the time the main answer is “everywhere”. Haha. Great.

My first thought is always :  “If you need to “find ideas to blog about”, you shouldn’t blog”. Racing cars are better. You can also shoot flying plates, lift some weight, or train some fleas.

But it doesn’t work like that, I knowwww…

I suppose this happens when one blogs for a reason – to make money, to meet people, to be famous, whatever :

  1. Why do you blog?
  2. How do you blog?

If you blog because of this pattern which is “something HAS TO go out” – the urge of expression, you won’t ever ask yourself how to find ideas, right?

They literally flow out of you, they squirtspatter in your WordPress’s drafts. That’s cute, in a way!

The Importance of rumunchewminating drafts

 

OK I go on : How to find ideas to blog about? Google helps with plenty of good ideas.

My way is to use a reading grid, a reading framework you will use on EVERYTHING you meet, a book, a title, a person, a star, a story : everything. You can use a few, if you like.

For example you can watch the world :

  • Historically (“I travelled in this Norway city, which…”)
  • Reversely (“10 ways to become fat”)
  • Engineerely (“this insect is a machine”)
  • Negatively (“sports are for idiots”)
  • Paranoia-Matrixely (all I see is crafted to lure me)
  • Religiously (a god takes care of me)
  • Newagely (the universe sent all this to make me grow)
  • Scenaristically (everything could be put in a story)
  • Nostalgically (link all things to your past)
  • Toolboxerly (well, this is what I do)

 

My toolbox is made of this : I try to find a framework, a structure, a grid, a pattern, in everything I see. If the structure is already here, I LOVE to share it. As, maybe, a suggestion to do the same, to think.

For example, to notice that Edouard Manet (the painter) and Jeff Wall (the photographer) have a common way to question the public, to notice that Mad Max and operas have many things in common, to find how great artists (Miles Davis, Pablo Picasso or William Faulkner) 1/ push themselves in unknown territories 2/ play with avant-garde 3/ break complex skills because it became to easy for them 4/ find another breath near the end of their lives… Etc.

 

Well, sorry, that’s all ! Find your grid, frame everything you meet and see under this grid, and ideas will squirtspatter. Apply, watch, that’s it : yeepee!

Thanks for reading! (sorry to destroy English like that)

 

art 021.jpg

 

All your blog articles are translated

Building words
It’s a strong energy

 

When you write a blog article, you use a combination of processes, which are all similar to translation.

  • You have a confused “big picture” idea you need to put into an article
  • You have a necklace of confused ideas you need to put into sentences
  • You have the words and they go fast, you don’t type fast enough
  • You are, while typing, parasitized by the process of shaping it
  • While you write and shape, the critic into you judges what’s written
  • All these are disturbed and jostled by new spurting ideas pushing in the back
  • You have to link your paragraphs
  • You have to check your spelling
  • You have to work through your reasoning, from beginning to end

 

All these (and I forgot probably a dozen more) are a like a translation between your boiling brain AND the words you see dancing on your screen.

 A big part of writing is choosing…

Therefore what?

I don’t know!

What do you think? Do we need to be aware of that? What levers are available? What can we change? What for?

 

Have a nice day!

(ninoleone60)11275395_1767960050096914_94266862_n.jpg

Instagram : ninoleone60

French Hair Splitting & Writer’s Pleasure Seepage

Hi everybody, and Happy New Year 2018!

I was writing an article called “Can our New Year’s Resolutions become our Best Wishes for others?”, where I spilled that I mostly wanted to carry on writing my little articles.

I split hairs in some of them, and, well, I like it. I have pleasure thinking about these micro-tools, patterns and other useless French thingumbobs. Plenty of fun!

In French we call it “Couper les cheveux en quatre” : “To cut hairs in four” – as you maybe know, for us a hair is a strand of hair, as we have many, we have “hairs” on our head (DES cheveux).

I know you say “to split hair”, I suppose the image is you split a strand of hair all along the line, right? In France we just take a strand of hair and cut it in four pieces, haha.

 

If I blog, it’s because I like to share, and I hope an article-tool can maybe be useful for one or a few persons. But what I love the most, it’s when someone feels that an article talks about something one knew, but one had never seen it written anywhere before. A little crystallization. Like : “Heyyyy but he’s right!”.

Splitting hairs, why? I know it’s negatively charged, but I imagine it’s OK too. It talks about taking a magnifier, to focus, to take care of a concept so small that nobody thought it deserved a study. It’s quirky but smiling. Meticulousness. Méticulosité.

 

I got a key from a reader (hello SHESOU_HEHYOU!) a few days ago in an article about how to find the smile in Cioran or Bernhard : From frowny eyes to hilarity : When you have to “find the fun” – Cioran & Bernhard.

She wrote :

Perhaps, it is just as Barthes said, in the Le plaisir du texte (1973), of ‘Jouissance’ :
“If I read this sentence, this story, or this word with pleasure, it is because they were written in pleasure (such pleasure does not contradict the writer’s complaints).”

That’s a good key, my friends : write, write, and write. As long as you have pleasure, even if you split hairs, or complain : you’re on a good path.

 

Have a nice day!

Jean-Pascal

missfionahill_-_Wild_flowers_and_sunbeams__caturday__flowersvassette__russianblue__cat__catsofinstagram__australia__wildflowers__flowersvasette.jpg

Instagram : missfionahill

And also this : Paul Valéry about “writing for someone”?