Poumeyrol, French painter

Jean-Marie Poumeyrol was born in 1946. This French painter is said to be a “fantastic realist” (which probably must makes him smile). Symbols. Erotica. Lands. Boats…

I like him a lot for a couple or reasons : it’s gorgeous, but also enigmatic. Some paintings are like… games, riddles. You need time to see things, guess what’s happening (whose shoes are they, in the first picture?), etc…

But as usual with great artists, photographers, poets, painters : words are very, very weak to explain. So :

1VMgzcMpV1EP4NU2HaMceXP3eeAPoumeyrol-x5Poumeyrol-L'Amiepoum407jean-marie-poumeyrol-07i6cR1FIQeDo1-w72R4FJQCXk0l0abri_troglodytique4nkqF2TxZjy1ARcbY41nHAotedg1L-5UMmIfHGBEnC39QaiqnuRFeA

 

Gleanpickupping seeds & tools in a Gidon Kremer interview

In a French grey morning of August, I’ve had my coffee with two good slices of brioche, frame window staring, in front of an ominous sky, at the cut out moving trees in the wind, shhhh.

Mind wandering…

According to your job, your availability, your passions, you have different way of “entering contact with reality” :

  • A photographer type will watch around him with the “Can I take a picture here, when, from where?”.
  • A musician type will analyze some new song he hears, decorticating it like an alarm-clock.
  • A poet type will find a good word in a book then might begin to weave a poem in his head.
  • The climber type will watch these city walls… etc…

You… just have to put your “mode on” (and YES, you can have many “modes on” ready in your head, haeccity oblige).

 

I read an interesting interview of Gidon Kremer, violonist, in a classical music magazine. I read this interview with two modes on.

  1. First was : “Find maybe some music to listen to” (I found Schumann, Weinberg, Arvo Pärt, and a Prokofiev melody)…
  2. The other one was my blogger mode : “What little structure, what tool, what tropism can I find in his interview?”.

 

So, well, I learned things about Gidon Kremer himself, his friends, career, evolutions, wonders, etc. He’s an interesting person, the typical clever artist (for me he’s a cousin of Bill Bruford, the drummer).

Eventually, my second “mode on” found quotes, wonders, seeds to plant (here or there) and to meditate on :

  • We live a physical house, but also in some spiritual homes, other “places” we belong to.
  • Playing very few notes is more difficult than pure virtuosity.
  • When you find difficult to play or understand something, you maybe need to find parallel structures in other artists or situations : comparison enrichment.
  • You can explore a field (movies, music) with artists, eras, but also labels or studios, producers, etc. Let’s write something about ECM.
  • Should an artist listen or study what he did in his past? (Kremer never listens what he recorded in previous years).
  • When an artist collaborates, there’s a need of “mutual listening”.
  • Sometimes we miss something. Friends around us indicate things or persons but we don’t listen – when we maybe should.
  • Then and therefore : what is to catch up? How do we? What is “to redeem”, how?
  • “Seeking perfection is the enemy of beauty”

 

Etc etc. I found a few more. Whatever. Each line is a door to a new room, which is full of questions. How to drive “mutual listening”? What becomes virtuosity with very little notes to play? Where the frontier to find between catching up and letting go? Etc…

I found this too : when you have one or many “modes of exploration”, it becomes difficult sometimes to be in direct contact. You ALWAYS have a filter on, and that can be exhausting!

We have to find back a way to quit our introvert-analyzer inner computer to… touch things. I suppose it’s what great artists can do, having the great ability to move it like a lever, a slider, from 0 to 100%, from “I know this without any words” to “Analyze and peel it off to understand it”. Where is yours?

 

Thanks for reading!

 

To write this article, I needed music. I chose Weinberg by Kremer – of course. The YouTube link is under the sleeve, downstairs :

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Socrates has a question for you

I read one day that Socrates asked to a master of ballet :

“Who are you and… how do you know?“.

There are many questions you can ask to someone you’re interested in, where do you come from? or what happened in your life? or what’s new? or what are you working on? or tell me what’s difficult? or what did you learn? or who is important in your life?, etc, but :

How do you “know” means a lot. How do you increase your knowledge? What is your package, your bond to reality, your system, your measures? Do you read? Do you watch things, people, actions? Do you think? Do you remember? In what way? What do you seek? What is the nature or the knowledges you pile up in your brain? Do you have models? How is it cleared up? What for? Are you curious, where, how, and why? What are you weary of? Senses? Interpretations? Where could we be mistaken, why? Do you need to understand or to change something?

It could seem pointless, but I don’t think it is. Because these questions ask about this :

What is your out/in interface with the world, and how does it work?

Just an example : memory. We all know that our memory is not perfect, and THAT is interesting : it doesn’t work properly, this is why we can work, interpret, metathink, analyse, retry, write, rethink, etc…

You’re a photographer : how do you know? You have your technical skills, right? And then? How do you know what to photograph? How do you know when to trigger? How do you know if the frame or the light is OK? How do you… make progress?

Now play this game with others :

Tool : How do you KNOW?

…when you’re a poet, a photographer, a teacher, a priest, a spouse, a journalist, a blogger, a writer, an architect.

And yesss, haecceity : you can be all of them, right?

Thanks for reading!

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Let us enrich ourselves with our mutual differences.

Paul Valéry

 

 

Mikhail Vrubel, Russian Painter

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikhail_Vrubel

Vrubel (1856-1910) was a Russian Painter.

You can Google Image his name or “Михаи́л Алекса́ндрович Вру́бель” to find his work. It’s haunting, like made of scales, and it’s a perfect example, for me, or strangeization

When you encounter his work, there’s a chance your brain begins to… like… address his case. It’s a very good indication, for me!

After the picture of his Seated Demon, there’s a fragment of the right part, like it?

Thanks for reading!

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Reasons why some people reject modern #Art

Nathalie Heinich is a French sociologist. She studied the reasons why people disliked modern art. Here’s a part of her list. What will you do about it?

Values in the domain of modern art rejection :

  • It’s disgusting, unpleasant
  • It’s not beautiful
  • It’s not art
  • It’s meaningless
  • A child could do the same
  • It’s made to get noticed
  • It’s made to make money
  • Lack of inspiration
  • It’s not serious
  • It’s dangerous
  • It’s obstructing the pathway
  • It’s useless
  • It’s unpopular, incomprehensible
  • It’s racist, sexist, obscene, cruel

Thanks for reading!

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Instagram : lena_rx

Fruitful Constraints & Creativity

It’s an old tool many artists know : many constraints are fruitful. Mainly because a constraint is a problem calling for a solution, therefore you have to move, to be creative.

All jobs and activities have constraints : budget, environment, other people, time, space, your skills, your tools.

If it’s too loose, though, you feel a freedom, which can be messy. You can not catch anything. Stuck. You maybe need to tight something up, to find “your” freedom within a new frame.

Brian Eno invent the Oblique Strategies (mainly for musicians) as a card game. You pick a card and you have to obey (sometimes it’s terrible!). Some directors are well known to tell the actors to follow precisely something (the dialogs, or the places they have to move on the set, etc) before shooting. Some digital artists sometimes go out in a park with a pencil and a notebook. A photographer can go outside with the limit of 20 pictures taken, not much. And G. Perec wrote an entire book without the letter “e”.

 

Constraints are fruitful. You probably have many disposable levers for these. A poet can obey : write something in alexandrine; without any letter “p”, in less than 5 minutes. You may have to present a project in ONE minute only, and… with no words. What are your levers?

You can pull a lever to Zero, it’s the Total Constraint. For example, you’re a photographer and you go out without any camera. Just your eye. You’ll feel the need, you’ll feel your brain simmering. As you can only watch and… think, you’ll maybe have bursts of ideas (instead of taking pictures).

Of course it’s an example of “Amor Fati”, being content with what happens to you, even if it seems bad. Embracing fate : every constraint, if you can’t avoid it, should (and will have to) be danced with.

Thanks for reading!

 

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Instagram : f_pilvi

Aaron Nakahara’s Digital Art

I’m just an ignorant in this field, but I often wander on DeviantArt to discover digital artists. There are masters, there are thousands of interesting artists. And sometimes, in the middle of bunches of good ones,  your eyebrows never stop to get up. Like “Heyyyy”…

Aaron Nakahara – Cobaltplasma is one of them.

There’s a good path to follow to begin : explore his favorites in Deviant Art : http://cobaltplasma.deviantart.com/gallery/. You’ll find artists with a talent for : faces, drama, landscapes, darkness or colors, space, energy or perspective. This “door” could be enough to explore the whole website : explore their favorites’ too, and you have your own pathway into this, out of “popular” things, etc.

Him? I like his freedom and the part of casualness you smell in his fast sketches. His sense of exaggeration is amazing! His lines…

He writes a little text under some of his drawings, I invite you to read them.

peace_and_harmony_by_cobaltplasma-d9pkbo2call_of_the_dragon_by_cobaltplasma-da2f2xwaaron-nakahara-setsunaiiIt makes me wonder : will this guy become a master in finished pieces, or in his “30 mn” sketches?

Thanks for reading!

http://www.denjin108.com/

https://www.artstation.com/artist/cobaltplasma

https://www.instagram.com/cobaltplasma

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