A thinktool for bloggers : Intertextuality (“the meaning of a text does not reside in the text”)

In this article I chose the French way, Barthes’ interpretation :

“An intertextual view of literature, as shown by Roland Barthes, supports the concept that the meaning of a text does not reside in the text, but is produced by the reader in relation not only to the text in question, but also the complex network of texts invoked in the reading process” (Wikipedia)

Barthes always attacked the notions of “stable meaning and unquestionable truth” : any text offers a plurality of meanings and is also weaved out of numerous already existing texts – Barthes probably hated being told to sit still!

Thus there are two types of readers :

  1. Consumers who read the work for stable meaning
  2. Readers who are productive in their reading


Worse (or better, depends on you) :

“It is language which speaks, not the author; to write is… to reach the point where only language acts, “performs”, and not “me””

plus :

“The author has the role of a compiler, or arranger, of pre-existent possibilities within the language system”.


OK, that’s enough. Here we are with a pattern which can be examined and played by bloggers :

  1. Do you write to say your say, do you aim stable meaning, or do you wish your readers to be the second kind, the “producers”, who will take your ideas/tools and use them THEIR way?
  2. Of COURSE you stole all your articles from others : books, magazines, articles, conversations. What did you do with this material? You simplified? You combined? You linked? You melted? What are the engines you use in your writer’s brain?
  3. “It is language which speaks, not the author”, what does that mean? How (and why) would you try to reach that curious and magic state? Where’s the balance between your logic and your flow?
  4. Do you draw maps? What stays opened in your articles? Do you “close” all of them at the end? Do you offer fishes, or ways of fishing?


“The role of the artist is to ask questions, not answer them.”
Anton Chekhov


Thanks for reading!


Instagram : wjtk_o


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Wonderfool Dayda Cacography : Eye Spelling!

I tried 241 times to pronounce Dakota (“DayGO-Da”?) until I gave up and pronounced it the French way (as it is : Da Ko Ta, plain and simple). Watching Ghost in the Shell, I heard the word “Data” many times, mimicking it to learn something, until I understood that DATA is pronounced DAYDA.

Foreigners make mistakes. This morning I woke up with some words in my mind, this marvelous way one friend of mine described my lover at the time : “Quelle formidable folle!” – What a wonderful fool she was, indeed. I woke up like : Wonderfool.

So I googled it and discovered this : Eye Spelling, Eye Dialect, or Pronunciation Spelling – nonstandard spelling but doesn’t indicate an unusual pronunciation.

women : wimmin
gentlemen : genlmen
listen : lissen
light : lite

Nooooo I won’t use it, it’s too dangerous. I could “get mixed up” (is it good English? Become mixed up?), though I know that it’s really used to get the “dialog” mood : kinda for kind of, wanna for want to. Also, it’s used for marketing purpose of course : I found “Froot Loops” cereals, froot for fruit, of course.

Now think about this group names : The Beatles. The Byrds. And the way rap groups use U instead of You.

Tool : What will you do of that? What could you invent? Where? Why? A name? A brand? A groupe name?

A deliberate comic mispelling is called CACOGRAPHY. I love that word so much that I almost fainted… Awweee!


Have a good day!





Words and Concepts are Liars

“Through words and concepts we are still con­tinually misled into imagining things as being simpler than they are, sep­arate from one another, indivisible, each existing in and for itself”.

Nietzsche, Human All Too Human

This is huge. I think every thinker is aware of this problem. Words and concepts put us in cages, we “think” they explain or describe reality, but they are NOT. Words simplify things, it’s very convenient, to analyze, to draw maps for the mind. But they are not enough.

Poets and photographs know this very well. They work BETWEEN the words, in subtleties and complexity.

It’s ALWAYS more complex than we think.

It why I wrote so many times about labels. If you discover your son is autistic or gifted, you immediately put him in a “box with a label“, and it’s a forever thing!

But there are millions of shades, and each of them… are moving, changing, evolving.

So we often think we know, but we don’t. We don’t know anybody, for example. We’re all islands, we’re complex, we have many faces, and we change along the days.

You can say : “He’s sad”, but you’ll never know how it moves, and how much sad he is, and if it is colored with sarcasm, suicide ideas, or hidden hope. You don’t know if he is aware of all that. You have to talk for a long time with him, to know.

Words are dangerous because they make you more stupid. We have to use them, because it’s the way we communicate, but we constantly need to remember their weakness.

Have a nice day!


Instagram : itspeteski

Fuir -> To Flee/To Leak – a #Deleuze word game

Fuir is a French verb, well, TWO French verbs, which are homonyms :

  1. Fuir : To flee
  2. Fuir : To leak

Therefore, it’s the same for “la fuite”, two homonyms :

  1. Fuite : a flight, an escape
  2. Fuite : a leak

So I suppose you understand it’s a bit “weaved” in our French brain. And if I ask “Fuite” in http://www.wordreference.com/, I find interesting things to prove it :

  • Fuite de capitaux : Capital flight (a leak, a flee)
  • Fuite des cerveaux : Brain drain (idem)
  • Ligne de fuite : Convergence line (in French, so, more like “a lign of flight”)

Gilles Deleuze is a playful philosopher. He likes to play with concepts to make tools.

He notices that to flee is NOT to renounce, or to give up, it’s a real action. To fly away is going on a line which stays like a symbol. It’s fuir (to flee) but also faire fuir (to “make a leak”). To run away is sometimes like to puncture the place you leave. You leave a hole, maybe… Therefore, a leak…

Fuir/Fuir : Flee/Leak.

Yeah I know, it’s a game of words, but it can give birth to ideas, right?

I like this idea too : to run away is to draw a line. Where you ran away, you have to do something else, the place you “leaved” (OK, left) does something else too. Flee as a disturbance. Each of them draws new lines, more lines. It’s like inventing new maps. To flee is quitting a territory A to go to another territory (B). Is it a “go back”? A flee & discovery? If there’s a leak on B, what is its nature? What happens, then? Can the runaway bird be replaced? By what? If you fly away, are you forced by something, pushed away, is it a choice?

More Territories games : you can see here.

Have a good day!



8 little Concerns with no name

Le Baleinié is a French little book, a dictionnary of 454 INVENTED WORDS about “les tracas”, concerns and bothers and fusses. I offer some examples for you pleasure.

Azog : your right shoe laced up tighter than the left

Bahan : a simple word you always forget

Chouir : to act as if you didn’t get the splutter

Dadu : impolite noise the chair does when you sit on it

Miasliquer : to sit on your cat

Flomper : to gain pounds when after you stop smoking, and then keep the weight once you’re back on smoking

Grucinelle : space between you sock and the bottom of your trousers, in which an icy wind can blow

Igourie : the gift you have to “search first in the wrong pocket”

See? We have a whole book of these little concerns, in France.

Have fun!

#eyes #face #symetry #instagood


Faire à manger (to cook), Faire pipi (to pee). In France, we “faire” a lot…

In France we make love, but we also make food (faire à manger), make some jogging (faire du jogging), and we make some boat too (faire du bateau).

I really don’t know why we French do this, the “faire” thing, and I wonder if there’s another language with this mess.

More : we all know that our “way of thinking” in the world is like built in the language. What does it imply?

A few more examples to play with :

  • Faire du gringue : to flirt.
  • Faire fi : to ignore.
  • Faire du vélo : to bike.
  • En faire une maladie : to have a fit (oh?).

Strangely enough, in France we say “prendre une douche”, like in English “to take a shower”. Italian people, though, “fare una doccia” : to make a shower”!

Thanks for reading!


Instagram : francescasomavilla

Préciosité – a French #Language mess

Who were Les Précieuses? A few ladies in some salons, in the 17th Century, under the reign of Louis XIV, king of France.

What is it all about? A very affected way of using words, with some quirky metaphors and periphrasis, banishment of “bad words”, a strong will to be original and precious. An overstatement of elegance and exquisiteness…

Of course it sounded pretentious (Molière satirized the Précieuses in his play Les Précieuses ridicules.), but it’s funny to watch it today. And it can be tool to work with.

Examples : 

  • A hand : “moving beauty”
  • Teeth : “mouth furniture”
  • Of course the eyes became “the mirrors of the soul”

There’s a French Dictionary of preciousity here : http://www.miscellanees.com/s/somaize.htm

Consequences :

Some idioms, in France, come from this period. We say “un billet doux” (“a sweet note”) for a love letter, and “perdre son sérieux” (“to lose one’s seriousness”) when you begin to laugh!

Dial :

What are the territories, today, which will maybe considered as “Précieuse” in the future?

Tool :

It can be a very little but useful tool in a brainstorming session. Stop everything. Gather what you already got, and make it Précieuse.

A common sense says that “less is beautiful”. So what if “more is beautiful… in another way”?

What can you MAKE précieuse? Words, of course. Design? Objects? Art? Poetry?

Thanks for reading!

Instagram : ___bodylanguage___