Loaf & Book : The Feng Shui of Things

The loaf, on the table, is upside down. Do you turn it up? Yes you do.

The book, on the shelf, is upside down. Do you turn it up? Yes too.

Why?

OK, it’s meant to be on the correct side. And it’s ugly to watch. Or you “feel” the bread and the book despair, you want to save them from uncomfortability.

Feng shui is about “harmonizing everyone with the surrounding environment”. It’s interesting to explore, though I mainly relate to my instinct “does this look right or not?” instead of << rules >>.

Most of the time, the rules of Feng shui corroborate my instinct. For example : when you lie in your bed, ready to sleep, you HAVE to be able to see the door, right? You could say it’s only logical but you know it’s not only logical. You feel it. Like the poor bread loaf, gasping for help like a dying tortoise it is.

  • En aparté, from aside, I would like to tell you something :
  • In French we do not have a word for a loaf (well, there’s a word, une miche (pronounce mish), but we don’t use it), we say “un pain” (a bread).
  • For a slice of bread, we have “une tartine” (say tarteen), but we often say “du pain”.
  • So, well, we miss a loaf word, but you miss a tartine word too. Pffff…
  • Instead of “spreading something of a slice of bread”, we say the verb : tartiner.

Harmony, balance, l’équilibre. It’s probably an old instinct we have, right? Or is it an Interesting Braid between instinct and logic?

Tool : Bwaaah you got it, right? Where will you apply that? Things and places, but also? What could be a Feng shui of poetry? Of photography?

Thanks for reading!

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Instagram : loudesvilles_

 

 

Riding the Tiger’s Back… and fall

This comes from a Chinese idiom : “Riding on the back of a tiger and finding it hard to get off” : someone is stuck in a difficult position and has no way out.

Once you start riding the tiger you can’t voluntarily get off or you will be eaten ! Let’s find it fascinating for many reasons…

  • It’s a tiger, dangerous and maybe powerful. So you can choose to STAY on the back of the tiger, and try to master it, or tame it (well, you can try…). You’ll fail, though, almost evidently.
  •  You probably chose to ride the tiger : why ? Are you crazy ? In despair ?
  •  There are colors on this picture : sarcasm probably, including auto-sarcasm (“haha, you’re stuck, you idiot”), fear, resignation, fatality !
  • Illusion of power, with the secret inconscient knowledge that it’s a fake power or a dangerous one.
  •  It’s maybe a story of destruction : choosing to climb the back of the tiger creates a situation which will force you to change something.
  •  Jump and be eaten OR Kill the tiger yourself OR “use it” until someone understands…
  •  When someone understands that you’re stuck, he can kill the tiger, or you, or both.
  •  When the tiger’s dead, this person will cuddle you in love and will forgive you for having invented this stupid tiger. “Why did you do that, silly !?”
  • Or not. So there.

This is linked to the concept of the Wrong Way Up – of course : it is often a wrong and dangerous solution to climb on the back of the tiger. But sometimes of course you have no choice (which, from the inside of you, is called nihilism).

If you have examples, write to me : jeanpascal@wanadoo.fr – love ? job ? military ?

Tool/Lever/Dial : Play with dynamite, smart little man, invent a tiger situation and climb on the back of it – you probably have to. Don’t lament you’re dead and eaten, as a consequence. Wrong way up is wrong. The idioms says : there’s no way back. Don’t expect forgiveness.

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