Verbal Fencing : strong thumps are nothing against stingy words

A few weeks ago, sitting on a bench, I saw two male 15 years old students RUNNING from a small group sitting in a park. It was a chase!

The tall, big student caught the smart fast little one, and it began.

All cluttered with their bags, running. The tall one badly hit the small one in the back, gripped him. Shook him. Then with some judo-legged movements put him on the ground. Then put his fist against the cheek, crushing him strongly against the ground. He could have broken his teeth, because he was much stronger – and at this moment I was about to stand up and ask them to stop it. Like “Hey, calm down ,will you?”.

But they stopped. Stood up.

Then I saw something odd.

They both walked away, side by side, towards the group-with-girls. And the small guy was… like… comforting the tall one!

It’s been a little disturbing, but then the group was in the trees shade. It was a cool afternoon. Quiet. After school. All quiet.

 

I needed days to understand that all along, the small guy was the winner. He didn’t really fight back. It was NOT OK, right, I agree. Violence is bad. But I knew that the little student had triggered violence by what he said before. The other one was too kind (or too aware of the consequences of destroying his friend’s face) to really counter-attack. If you don’t have words (or the sense of repartee), you’re weak, even with muscles.

The small guy failed to regroup, to find back the tall one’s smile. “Allez, let’s be friends!”, he seemed to say with his gestures. But the tall one knew he lost. He was walking, in contained rage, with infuriated “NO. FUCK OFF” gestures.

 

Thanks for reading!

 

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First Ever & Hitherto Unheard, a words combination game

Fool’s dew – Heartened letterbox – Heavy-headed butterfly

Well that’s an easy game, keeping in mind that a little minibell could ring somewhere each time you pronounce a new combination of words. Ding!

Today you can even check with Google. Then you could be surprised : I googled “grapes in fire” and I found one. And I was wrong to imagine a Ding! with my “heavy-headed butterfly” : there’s one in a poem – by a Kathy Walden – with this one.

You get easier unheards when you :

  1. stick words together
  2. watch names on a “not my country” map and translate each
  3. combine words from different languages
  4. try to invent titles
  5. random play with a dictionary
  6. poetize
  7. combine three remote-fields words

 

What’s the purpose, dear?

Invention? A game to be “aware” of words? Seeds for poetry? A tool to find good article titles? An invitation to learn other languages?

Butterfly (flying butter, really??) in French is Papillon, in Spanish Mariposa. Play, combine, invert, etc…

 

Let write a poem (or a country music song, lalère) :

Hey heavy-headed butterfly
Grapes are on fire in the West

My heartened letterbox awaits
The fool’s dew for y’all

And a caterpillar cheek kiss

Are you all safe?

 

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Unholy Placed & Sized Prisms

A photograph worries.
He doesn’t want to enjoy the moment, but to take advantage of it.
Ernst Jünger

 

If you’re creative, or obsessed by something, your contact with reality is spoiled.

It is true that we all have an ideal way of seeing a wise person, who is in “direct contact” with things and events : reality. Without filter, as we say, right?

But think about a photographer. He watches around with a frame in his head. He constantly “imagine what picture it could give”. A photographer always is a hunter…

If you blog, you hear every conversation, you read every article with this fisherman attitude : “Is there something I could write about?”.

More generally, if you’re a words lover, your filter is a complete set : everything around you, everything that “happens” becomes words, sentences, adjectives.

All this is maybe a protection. It creates a distance between us and the world.

I wrote about this already :

Sometimes we’re HIT by reality, all in a sudden, we stickcatch up back. It can be a sight, a word, a surprise, a kid, a cat, a movement. Suddenly it’s OK : your filter vanished.

Here you are, look at youuuu!

Do we have to trigger it, to “want” this? Why? What happens when the filter comes back? What’s the role of alcohol (does it de-filter, or does it add a mattress?), of meditation, of pain, of love? Do we have to be aware of this filter working along the day? Is it useful to dance between the two states (with/without)?

Thanks for reading!

 

 

 

 

Wonderfool Dayda Cacography : Eye Spelling!

I tried 241 times to pronounce Dakota (“DayGO-Da”?) until I gave up and pronounced it the French way (as it is : Da Ko Ta, plain and simple). Watching Ghost in the Shell, I heard the word “Data” many times, mimicking it to learn something, until I understood that DATA is pronounced DAYDA.

Foreigners make mistakes. This morning I woke up with some words in my mind, this marvelous way one friend of mine described my lover at the time : “Quelle formidable folle!” – What a wonderful fool she was, indeed. I woke up like : Wonderfool.

So I googled it and discovered this : Eye Spelling, Eye Dialect, or Pronunciation Spelling – nonstandard spelling but doesn’t indicate an unusual pronunciation.

women : wimmin
gentlemen : genlmen
listen : lissen
light : lite

Nooooo I won’t use it, it’s too dangerous. I could “get mixed up” (is it good English? Become mixed up?), though I know that it’s really used to get the “dialog” mood : kinda for kind of, wanna for want to. Also, it’s used for marketing purpose of course : I found “Froot Loops” cereals, froot for fruit, of course.

Now think about this group names : The Beatles. The Byrds. And the way rap groups use U instead of You.

Tool : What will you do of that? What could you invent? Where? Why? A name? A brand? A groupe name?

A deliberate comic mispelling is called CACOGRAPHY. I love that word so much that I almost fainted… Awweee!

 

Have a good day!

Jean-Pascal

 

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“Add some light in places”, or why to intellectualize will never kill the magic!

This is an old pattern many people use, like an old, useless dusty tool. This one says something like :

In front of beauty, don’t intellectualize too much or else you’ll lose the magic

 

In sex, art, photography, any place where magic is found, of course we can say that wizardry exists because it unfolds out of the words’s limitations.

Even in fields like poetry or novels (where words are used), able to catch you with style and stories, and bring you in the domain of dreams.

And I’m the first to tell – and repeat – here in this blog, that it is wise to stay out of words, these weak labels, in many articles about how photographers or painters don’t like to explain, etc.

In front of beauty, don’t intellectualize too much or else you’ll lose the magic

Peel and decorticate magic, and you kill the goose (with the golden eggs, etc).

Well : Okey!

I’d add this word : BUT. Or this word : ALSO.

But, also, and nevertheless, there are days you wanna do it.

Analyze the magic of a novel. Dissect a music track. Have a precise conversation about sex. Use the pause button on your remote control to understand how a scene is edited. Read articles about masterpieces, and prefaces of old classics. Stop eating this delicious meal and try to find how it’s been cooked. Wonder how your love story is evolving…

This IS what intellectualizing is, it brings knowledge, shows you new paths, increases your intelligence, draws new maps, enlightens your universe, gives you more energy to explore, to dive deeper the next time you’ll plunge into your next “not thinking too much” moments…

Do you really think it “kills the magic”?

What if it rather adds some light in places?

Thanks for reading!

 

#layers
#layers

…to meditate is not to cut off the brain…

Imagine a train passing by, just in front of you, as if you were : a cow. But it’s so long you begin to grazenibble a little grass. Then… little by little the sound of the train begins to diminish, until, as the train goes on passing by, you’re in SILENCE. There is a train and you watch the train but you don’t hear the train you don’t think about the train anymore, you don’t even NAME the train :  It’s now just a movement, a neutral colored passing quiet undifferentiated no-thing.

This is what is meditation, for me.

You simply DON’T “cut off” your thoughts, because it’s impossible.

Our brain is used to put words on things, thoughts, feelings. We feel something and we label it : “I’m depressed”, “I’m hungry”, “I’m sarcastic”, “I’m slow”. When you meditate, you little by little see or think about things without putting words on what’s happening.

 

“To see is to forget the names of the thing one sees.”
“Regarder, c’est oublier les noms des choses que l’on voit”
― Paul Valéry

 

But what is to meditate? Not much : sit, focus on something unimportant (your breathe, a mandala, a mantra, a candle) and that’s all. Never try to “control” your wringing messknots. It’s just there.

Here, I need a French word, “la déprise“, which could be the “unseizure”, the act to “decide to unhold, untake”. Reality is here, your thoughts are here, you just don’t plug to them while you meditate. They’re like flying birds far far up up there…

Watch without judging – OBSERVE WITHOUT ANY CONCLUSION

Thanks for reading!

 

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