Paul Valéry : “The adversary’s great triumph…

The adversary’s great triumph is have you believe what he says of you

Paul Valéry

 

 

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“Le grand triomphe de l’adversaire est de vous faire croire ce qu’il dit de vous.”

Paul Valéry

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“Wisdoms”, a poem by P. Valéry

WISDOMS

One wisdom runs away from love
Like the beast flees the fire;
She’s scared of being devoured.
She’s afraid of being consumed.

One wisdom looks for it,
And like the intelligent being,
Far from fleeing it, blows on the flame,
Makes it her strength and melt the iron,

Thereby, Love offers her his powers.

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SAGESSES

Une sagesse fuit l’Amour
Comme la bête fuit le feu;
Elle craint d’être dévorée.

Elle a peur d’être consumée.

Une Sagesse le recherche,
Et comme l’être intelligent,
Loin de la fuir, souffle la flamme,
La fait sa force et fond le fer,

Ainsi l’Amour lui prête ses puissances.

Paul Valéry

Paul Valéry, a poem about the thinker & the sea

This quiet roof, where dove-sails saunter by,
Between the pines, the tombs, throbs visibly.
Impartial noon patterns the sea in flame —
That sea forever starting and re-starting.
When thought has had its hour, oh how rewarding
Are the long vistas of celestial calm!

Ce toit tranquille, où marchent des colombes,
Entre les pins palpite, entre les tombes;
Midi le juste y compose de feux
La mer, la mer, toujours recommencée
O récompense après une pensée
Qu’un long regard sur le calme des dieux!

 

Translation impossible, as usual. This verse : “La mer, la mer, toujours recommencée”. Why not “That sea forever starting and re-starting”. I also found “The sea, the ever renewing sea!”. The truth is it’s “The sea, the sea, always rebegun”

O reward after a thought, staring longly on gods quietness…

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One-Lined Ideas for Writers, Part II

The suites of transformations you need to express things, respecting the conditions your have to respect.

You write, you read what you just wrote, in a loop. A closed balanced between you and you. A pleasure can resonate.

Pull weapons out of other people’s work – to use you own resources.

Find the person you write for – even if this person does not really exist. Golem it.

Use what is made for use. Find a drawer : open it. Break what is fragile. Push what tilts.

Try what has never be done, but appears as possible.

Your work can always been gone back over. This is your job. Find your “until”.

Try a thousand ways to write an idea until you meet a favorable words figure.

Find a force. Find where to use it. Apply a force.

At one moment you are attracted by what is needed, by what goes forward to the goal.

You dream to write, you desire to write, you call. But it’s not to be confused with the state where you MAKE.

Our most precious states are unstable – the artist answers trying to stabilize them.

What you feel. What you do. What you want to make feel.

 

All these microseeds come from Paul Valéry‘s Poietis (Poïétique). They aren’t quotes, I kneaded them for your pleasure. Have fun.

One-Lined Ideas for Writers, Part I

Thanks for reading!

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One-Lined Ideas for Writers, Part I

A writer doesn’t find his words. While he searches, he finds better ones.

How to read an instinct?

A writer places himherself on a place where he finds things on the left and language on the right.

The inventor saw, then showed.

Maybe art is one language opposed to the necessary disorder of the language.

A writer is able to abandon an idea in favor of another idea he found while he was looking for the words to tell the first one.

A worried sense of the possible, of the usable.

You have to find balance between intellect, exactitude, reason, cold, logical AND absurd harmonies, magical non sense, sensibility.

The geometric mind extracts signs, systems, structures and patterns from a question, a situation. Then he plays with the system, blind from reality, until he finds every useful aspects or facets he wants to put into light.

Embarrassments born from a find.

Some freedoms not imagined yet.

A writer who looks for the perfect effect. A writer who wants to learn something. Who’s right? One? Two? Both?

One secret is to give invisible things to the reader.

The one who wrote a verse wanted to move, not to be moved.

Importance of a text for an author, function of the unforeseen-ness it brings from himher to himherself while he builds it.

An idiot says a chair is a chair. The abundance of certain spirits is to use everything, to eat it, to turn around it and find patterns and possibles. A chair can be a ladder, a stake, a gym tool, a battering ram, a weapon, a stretcher, a cage…

All these microseeds come from Paul Valéry‘s Poietis (Poïétique). They aren’t quotes, I kneaded them for your pleasure. Have fun.

Thanks for reading!

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Two Thinkers Letters & Friendship : #Gide & #Valéry

Some friendships don’t need any oath.

It’s just there.

These days I’m happy because I found the best thinker I could imagine.

Paul Valéry (1871-1945) – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Val%C3%A9ry – a French poet, essayist and philosopher.

For me, he’s even stronger than Nietzsche!

In France, he’s known as a poet. That’s all…

Thus, I’m devouring his notebooks, his essays, his poetry : thousands of pages.

This guy is a genius! You can find his notebooks on the web. If you need seeds…

And, well, I read also books from André Gide (1869-1951) – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andr%C3%A9_Gide

Hence, I discovered they were friends.

I just ordered and got an almost 1000 pages book of their correspondence.

I was so glad to get it! As I was opening the box tonight, I thought : “Two of the best thinkers of their time!”…

…which I found on the back cover of the book :

“This friendship is a dream come true : two of the most gifted and most clever writers of their generation met at the beginning of their careers”.

A friendship.

Nothing, absolutely nothing (they were very different) could work loose or detach this friendship.

Valéry says it’s not about literature or common or complementary tastes. It was the faculty to follow each other, to instantly adapt, to guess each other with happiness…

In an article of Le Monde, the French newspaper, I found this :

“Leur dialogue de dandys supérieurs porte sur les moyens et la manière, jamais sur les principes et les fins”.

“Their dandy dialog is always about the means and the ways, never on the principles and the ends”.

Most of you will get it, right?

 

Well, that’s all, dear. I just wanted to share!

Thanks for reading!

Jean-Pascal

 

“…and nothing is more certain than an inclination which exist in itself, without any argument, without common feelings or ideas – like with no reason”.

P. Valéry

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