The intense photography of Trente Parke, Part II

Here are a few color photos from Trente Parke. “Intense”, that’s not so simple. I love photographers who pushes leverages : darks are too dark, colors are too much. But also : the compositions are gorgeous, the light is splendid, shadows and lines are smart, the mood of the moment is always there – this is generous photography. This guy has it, right?

Coming-Soon-by-Trent-Parke-21BakerComing-Soon-by-Trent-Parke-2GreenSurfers-Paradise-Goldcoast-QLDStormHard-RockQueen-Victoria-Building-2Trent_Parke_Sydney9Trent_Parke_Sydney20Trent_Parke_Jurien_TreeComing-Soon-by-Trent-Parke-1Red-Lion-Hotel2007.21.original

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The intense photography of Trente Parke, Part I

Trent Parke (born 1971) is an Australian photographer, member of Magnum Photos.

For me he’s the best street photographer ever. You’ll find in his work : energy, composition, mystery, questions, technique (light, long pauses), intensity…

I’ll make a second article with his colors.

1999058JLLON38309LON38311LON38315LON38333LON38337LON38377LON38385LON38402AUSTRALIA. Sydney. Pitt st, city centre. 2002AUSTRALIA. Sydney. Hunter st, city centre. 2002AUSTRALIA. Sydney. Martin Place, city centre. 2002

French end of the afternoon near the sea Street Photography

Let’s imagine the levers you have in street photography.

  1. Consent : from “not telling anyone” you’re taking pictures to “asking politely to everybody you aim”.
  2. Speed : from “triggering one pic a second” to “carefully wait for a magic moment”.
  3. Movement : from “sitting on a corner with a zoom” to “taking pictures from a moving car”.
  4. Frame : from “by guesswork” or “single-handedly” to meticulousness.

 

I admit it’s not my cup of tea, but I played this exercise a few times. From a moving car, in summer, I took something like 200 pictures in twenty minutes. It had something with speed-aiming, improvisation, decisions, random, joy, openness, frustration…

Then watch them all on my computer, hoping I’d find a couple of good ones, then finding a few average ones, accepting bad framings, blurries, dark lights. I chose these.

If I have a mood, I’m happy. Hoping you’ll find one you like…

Thanks for reading!

 

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Stolen Street Photography?

Salgado says somewhere that a portrait is something one “offers” to the photographer (I should find the quote, but I don’t remember where I found it).

As I was walking back home the other day, I wanted to play the Street Photographer, but I didn’t want to ask.

So : I zoomed too much, and I underexposed, and I clicked maybe 200 pictures. Most of them, in consequence, were good for trash.

When I did it it was exciting. When I watch it I feel the slight nausea of those who “try things”, like when you take a guitar for the first time…

Conclusion :

  1. Most people notice when you steal their portrait – and I dislike to do this (I have empathy).
  2. I’m not Alex Webb (who is a genius in this field).
  3. I prefer to take portraits of toys, dolls and funny things on flea markets (last picture).
  4. I should buy a big zoom camera…
  5. …or ask people first.

Have a nice day !